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Future of youth mental health services discussed

Teenager - Girl

5:57am 14th September 2017

Over 130 people interested in youth mental health in Norfolk have come together to help shape the service's future.

Experts talked about how to grow the service, when more young people are needing help.

Doctor Tim Clarke was one of the team behind the conference.

He says they're thinking about using technology and buses to serve rural areas:

"So it's something we're definitely thinking about.

"With our youth mental health model that we have in Norfolk, we're really pleased that King's Lynn does have a dedicated service for 0-25-year-olds."

Tim added that they've seen a rise in referrals to their service, so that was partly the reason for the conference, to build us the service to cope with demand.

esrc_event-26 Tim Clarke

The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) seminar took place at OPEN on Bank Plain, and attracted delegates from across the country, as well as NSFT staff and young people with experience of using services and their families.

It provided an opportunity for around 120 people to come together and discuss the future direction of youth mental health services and how best to meet the needs of young people and their families.

The day-long event featured a host of expert speakers, including Dr Duncan Law from the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, Prof Swaran Singh from the University of Warwick, Prof Peter Jones from the University of Cambridge and Dr Nic Yeates and Dr Jon Wilson from NSFT.

Tonia Mihill from local youth charity MAP (Mancroft Advice Project), Polly Ashmore from NHS England and Emily Frith, former advisor to Norman Lamb MP and Director for Mental Health at the Education Policy Institute, completed the line-up.

Tim added:

"We were incredibly proud to host this seminar, which included a host of renowned national and local speakers and real experts in the field of youth mental health.

"Engaging and informative, the day gave health professionals, researchers and young people and their families and carers the chance to discuss how services are delivered now as well as exploring ways to further improve care in the future."

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